Living Rooms

The Chaise: An Elegant History

Whether the chaise brings up mental images of lounging royalty or Freudian talk therapy for you, this piece of furniture has an interesting history as the curious (and incredibly comfortable) blend of bed and couch.

The name chaise longue is French for “long chair”, and this piece of furniture as we know it has its origins in the 18th century—though it could be argued that the ancient Egyptians and Chinese, as well as Greeks and Romans, had their own takes on it. Also known as a daybed, the chaise longe is ideal for relaxing, stretching out and taking it easy. Variations on the design include the meridienne, which features a high headrest and one long armrest, the Recamier, which has two raised ends and no armrests, and the Duchesse brise, a chaise longue divided into the chair and a long foot stool. A chaise longue can have from four to eight legs, depending on how long it is.

The chaise is a perfect way to incorporate more fluid, laid-back design elements into a room, also encouraging openness and casualness. However, a beautifully detailed and upholstered chaise can also be a lovely element of more formal rooms, especially paired with a decadent pillow or two or a carefully-draped throw.

These days, it’s also possible to find more modern chaise pieces that incorporate elements like armchair design and audio panels, like the Jazzi red chaise, which you can plug your MP3 player into.  We also like the Mario chaise, which takes the sleek modern design of a comfy armchair and takes it a bit further.

Interested in a chaise of your own? Come see us at The RoomPlace, where you can see this and many other seating options and living room furniture in Chicago, Illinois and Indiana.

 

 

Categories: Living Rooms

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